Getting TPP Right

Canada’s lessons from NAFTA

Author: Dillon Fowler
Release Date: October 28, 2013
Pages: 15

As China begins challenging the U.S. for political and economic dominance in the pacific region, establishing free trade agreements with the rest of the continent is imperative for Canada. This makes the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP), a free trade deal that would span the Pacific Ocean but notably does not include China, an essential component of Canada’s long-term trade agenda.

Canada’s largest free trade agreement to date offers a cautionary tale in certain areas. While NAFTA has greatly contributed to economic growth across the continent, provisions related to domestic employment, natural resource conservation, and regulatory transparency have garnered legitimate criticisms and have fueled otherwise debunked arguments from those who are critical of free trade. Canadian policy makers would be wise to address similar provisions in upcoming negotiations with Asian nations in order to secure both better deals for Canada and stronger public support for free trade in general.

This paper will focus on the necessity of broadening Canadian trading relationships throughout Asia while avoiding the flaws that accompanied NAFTA.
Download: 1.4 MB (PDF)

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